Cap rails

<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 
  • February 24, 2014 8:41 PM
    Message # 1505238
    Deleted user

    Konami was hauled last summer for about 2 1/2 months for several projects which included pulling the Perkins M50 for 2000 hr maintenance, rudder fairing, and replacing the deteriorating teak cap rails with fiberglass. Most of the work was done with the direction and assistance of Dave King. We did a lot of the grunt work grinding and sanding but could not have done these projects without Dave's expertise and encouragement. We feel very lucky to have had the opportunity to learn from him.

    Here are some photos, mostly of the cap rail part of the project.

    Cap rail photos

  • February 25, 2014 5:22 AM
    Reply # 1505390 on 1505238
    Deleted user
    VERY nice job.  I've see that project attempted by a couple of others but it did not turn out nearly as well.  Kudos!

    Mike
  • February 25, 2014 7:28 AM
    Reply # 1505458 on 1505238
    John nice work on the caprail. 

    Could you explain photo numbers 27 & 28 what is going on in the photos? 
    In photo 38 is that a small router? 
    What happened in photo 43? 

    I think it looks nice and I want to glass over Harbingers caprail but still place the caprail over the glassed area. Did you simply remove as much of the deck/hull joint compound and begin glassing? What about the bolts - just leave them in too? 

    Thanks for sharing. 
  • February 25, 2014 10:44 AM
    Reply # 1505614 on 1505238
    Anonymous
    Some very nice work there, looks great.  I had wanted to glass the cap rails myself but without a Dave King around I didn't have the heart to try it.  Wow what a nice finished product. 
  • February 25, 2014 4:54 PM
    Reply # 1505879 on 1505238
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Very nice job - and the photos and words are a big help... I got tired looking at the images !!

    Jay

  • February 25, 2014 5:38 PM
    Reply # 1505900 on 1505238
    Hey great job, I was thinking of doing this myself but still wanted the wood, your idea of the eyebrow has made me  decide, I'll do it.
  • February 25, 2014 6:50 PM
    Reply # 1505926 on 1505238
    Deleted user
    Outstanding. Very nice write-up!!!

    Can I ask a few questions?  On the risers.  Were these layed up in a sheet then the curve cut out of the sheet from a template on a bandsaw?

    On the teak eyebrow.  Were these bent to the curve of hull?  Or were these band sawed as well. 





    Last modified: February 25, 2014 6:56 PM | Deleted user
  • February 26, 2014 8:53 AM
    Reply # 1506313 on 1505238
    Am I missing something? Where is the write up? Only thing I see are great photos. I need some information on this project. :) 
  • February 26, 2014 11:55 AM
    Reply # 1506464 on 1505238
    Deleted user

    I will try to answer some of the questions:

    Could you explain photo numbers 27 & 28 what is going on in the photos? 
    In photo 38 is that a small router? 
    What happened in photo 43? 
    Photos 27 and 28 are showing a longboard being used to rough sand the edges of the layup flush with the side of the hull. It was important to get this area flush so that the teak eyebrow would lay flush to the hull side.
    Photo 38 is a small router. It's referred to as a trim router and generally used to trim laminate installation on countertops.
    Photo 43 is an area where the glass layup overlaps and results in high and low spots that need to be filled and faired.
    I think it looks nice and I want to glass over Harbingers caprail but still place the caprail over the glassed area. Did you simply remove as much of the deck/hull joint compound and begin glassing? What about the bolts - just leave them in too? 
    We (mostly Diane) spent a lot of time scraping and grinding to remove as much old caulking/compound as possible. The original hull/deck joint screws were left in place. Some needed to be ground flush so they would not interfere with the layup. Dave also recommended that we drill out all the open holes left from the original cap rail. Diane drilled them oversize (5/16 i think) and countersunk them to provide a clean hole for the epoxy to bond to. We did the same with the jib car track bolt holes. I like to think this will also provide additional sheer strength to the joint. Diane and Dave put cotton in the holes to prevent the neet (unthickened) epoxy from running through.
    I am out of time right now but will answer more of the questions later.
    Thanks for all the compliments!
    Last modified: February 26, 2014 5:33 PM | Deleted user
  • February 26, 2014 1:17 PM
    Reply # 1506522 on 1505238
    Anonymous
    Really nice work.  No leaks, guaranteed.

    Question:  how did you secure your jib track?  Did you bolt it thru-rail?
    Last modified: February 26, 2014 2:22 PM | Anonymous
<< First  < Prev   1   2   Next >  Last >> 
Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software