Cleaning Teak

  • February 18, 2011 1:42 PM
    Message # 528828
    Deleted user
    Hi Bud, I need to clean some bleached out teak on the companionway hatch and the teak shroud (whatever it is called) that the hatch slides into. I have no desire to have it look 'yachty' so I want to clean off the bleached out look and paint it with Cetol. Is that what you would recommend? The bow pulpit can use some work, too.

    Thanks, and let's see how this new forum works. What initiated the change?
  • February 19, 2011 7:05 AM
    Reply # 529090 on 528828
    Deleted user
    Steve Waterman wrote: Hi Bud, I need to clean some bleached out teak on the companionway hatch and the teak shroud (whatever it is called) that the hatch slides into. I have no desire to have it look 'yachty' so I want to clean off the bleached out look and paint it with Cetol. Is that what you would recommend? The bow pulpit can use some work, too.

    Thanks, and let's see how this new forum works. What initiated the change?
    Hey, Steve...
    I know that you asked Bud and not me, but I thought I'd share our experience with you.  When we bought our W28, all the teak was grey.  That was fine with us for the decks but not for anything else.  We sanded the teak to get past the grey and back to it's original brown color. Then we used Cetol Natural Teak on it. It gave it a beautiful golden color that has worn well (we touch up as needed) and gotten us many compliments.  I don't like the color of the regular Cetol, but I really like the color of their Natural Teak.
    -Steve
  • February 19, 2011 6:47 AM
    Reply # 529100 on 528828
    Anonymous
    The linked picture is a before during and after of my teak cleaning this past summer.  I used a scrub brush and water to remove the gray, then I oiled the teak using a brush.

    Last modified: February 19, 2011 6:47 AM | Anonymous
  • February 19, 2011 10:12 AM
    Reply # 529169 on 529100
    Deleted user
    Robert McQueen wrote:
    The linked picture is a before during and after of my teak cleaning this past summer.  I used a scrub brush and water to remove the gray, then I oiled the teak using a brush.


    Hi Robert,
    That looks great. I, however, am not after beauty, just function and a rugged finish. The rest of the teak on the boat have been cleaned by some method and then painted with Cetol. I am just asking around to find the most wear resistant method. The boat has fiberglass decks, thanks to the original owner.

    Steve
  • February 19, 2011 10:14 AM
    Reply # 529171 on 529090
    Deleted user
    Stephen Yoder wrote:
    Steve Waterman wrote: Hi Bud, I need to clean some bleached out teak on the companionway hatch and the teak shroud (whatever it is called) that the hatch slides into. I have no desire to have it look 'yachty' so I want to clean off the bleached out look and paint it with Cetol. Is that what you would recommend? The bow pulpit can use some work, too.

    Thanks, and let's see how this new forum works. What initiated the change?
    Hey, Steve...
    I know that you asked Bud and not me, but I thought I'd share our experience with you.  When we bought our W28, all the teak was grey.  That was fine with us for the decks but not for anything else.  We sanded the teak to get past the grey and back to it's original brown color. Then we used Cetol Natural Teak on it. It gave it a beautiful golden color that has worn well (we touch up as needed) and gotten us many compliments.  I don't like the color of the regular Cetol, but I really like the color of their Natural Teak.
    -Steve

    A guy who works at the local Hamilton Marine store said to use a slightly diluted mixture of Clorox and water. Spray it on and wait a few minutes, scrub it with a stiff brush, rinse it off and when it is dry use Cetol on it. I will take your advice and use the Natural Teak version of the product, but first it has to get above freezing around here.......

    Steve W.
  • February 19, 2011 4:08 PM
    Reply # 529367 on 528828
    Steve Waterman wrote: Hi Bud, I need to clean some bleached out teak on the companionway hatch and the teak shroud (whatever it is called) that the hatch slides into. I have no desire to have it look 'yachty' so I want to clean off the bleached out look and paint it with Cetol. Is that what you would recommend? The bow pulpit can use some work, too.

    Thanks, and let's see how this new forum works. What initiated the change?


    I know lots of owners will sand the teak to get the gray out, but I prefer to not sand, but to bleach out the gray, and black, on the teak.  The black is usually mold, and any good bathroom mold cleaner will work fine.  For the gray, oxalic acid works well.  There was a recent post on the old website of a product the an owner purchased at Ace Hardware that worked very well.  I don't recall the name of the stuff, but you should be able to look it up on the old website.

    For a finish, I like Armada, which is similar to Cetol, but clear.  Since Cetol now makes a clear, that would also work well.  I just prefer Armada, if you can find it.

  • February 20, 2011 6:42 AM
    Reply # 529538 on 528828
    Bud, that was RustAid although it went up from 2.99 to 3.49. It comes in a spray bottle and has the consistency of hair gel which unfortunately I don't need anymore. I spread it on the damp wood after a cleaning with a dish soap and water solution using a paper towel and let it sit for about 10-15 minutes and then rinse off. I does not affect the gel-coat or skin for that matter. 
  • February 20, 2011 9:33 AM
    Reply # 529616 on 529538
    Deleted user
    Werner Hamp wrote: Bud, that was RustAid although it went up from 2.99 to 3.49. It comes in a spray bottle and has the consistency of hair gel which unfortunately I don't need anymore. I spread it on the damp wood after a cleaning with a dish soap and water solution using a paper towel and let it sit for about 10-15 minutes and then rinse off. I does not affect the gel-coat or skin for that matter. 

    Great, Werner. Now I can wait until it is warm enough to proceed. I'm making a list of things to do to the boat and most of them need at least 50 degrees. Right now it is about 25 and a little after noon in Rockland, ME.
  • February 20, 2011 10:05 PM
    Reply # 529920 on 528828
    I've always heard that I should never use a stiff brush on teak.  Like any wood, teak has hard and soft parts (can't recollect their correct names), and a stiff brush will surely scour out the soft and leave hard ridges (maybe great for footing but unnecessary).  The harder and more often you scrub the deeper the grooves get.  So every month or two I use Tilex and either a soft brush or a plastic scrub pad and go over all the teak including the deck.  We're on fresh water and mold is a greater problem than in an ocean environment.  I've tried teak oil, but it's a great foodstuff for mold.  I've tried a couple of proprietary coatings and... never again.  Having removed paint from all the teak (except the deck) with a heat gun, scrapper and sandpaper, I learned I don't really like refinishing so... its a spritz with the old Tilex, a good hose down, and a sail.  Once in awhile I'll throw salt on the deck but that's just so the boat doesn't forget where it came from.  In any event, my approach leaves the teak with a very soft faded brown color which personally I find quite pleasing.  Probably wouldn't please everyone, but I'm happy with it and prefer to sail than refinish and revarnish no matter how infrequently. But a stiff brush? Never.
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